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Full text of "Peninsular warm air circulators and pipeless furnaces: catalog no. 321"

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The peninsular stove compa 



DETROIT-CHICAGO 




Works, Salesrooms and General Offices 

DETROIT, MICHIGAN 

Western Offices, Salesrooms and Warehouse 

434-500 South Canal Street, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

TERMS 

AH Prices Subject to Change without Notice 

All accounts are due and payable net 30 days from date of invoice. 
Accounts paid within 10 days from date of invoice will be subject to a cash 
discount of two per cent. 

All bills payable in New York, Chicago or Detroit par funds. No allow- 
ance for exchange or express charges. 

Claims against invoices must be made within five days after receipt of goods. 

Transportation companies make two classifications, viz., carrier's risk and 
owner's risk (released). When shipped at carrier's risk, rates are two or 
three times higher than when shipped at owner's risk. Hence we always 
ship at owner's risk, released. 

Breakages 

We shall, however, always be pleased to assist the trade in overcoming 
breakage or overcharges by transportation companies, or the mishandling of 
any of our shipments. Your request in this connection will have our prompt 
attention. 

A nominal charge on all parcel post shipments will be made for packing and 
insurance. 

Claims for damages or shortage must be made within 30 days from date 
ot shipment, as the transportation companies require. 

Do not refuse a shipment on account of damage, but call the agent's atten- 
tion to Its condition, have him note it on freight bill, then pay freight charges. 

If agent will not accept claim, get his written refusal. Send us all the 
papers and we will endeavor to collect for you. 

Claims for trivial or incidental breakage will not be entertained. 



Page Two 




THE PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY, DETROIT-CHICAGO 

The Importance of Installing a Warm 

Air Circulator Large Enough to 

Economically Heat a Building 

The most important point in installing a Warm Air 
Circulating and Heating System is to use a circulator 
that is large enough to heat the house or dwelhng 
economically in zero weather. One that does not have 
to be run over its maximum efficiency. 

In making tests of our circulators the following 
scientific instruments are used: 

1 — A Mercury Thermometer, which registers the 
temperature of the air. 

2 — Anemometer, which is used to measure the veloc- 
ity of the cold air going into the circulator and the 
warm air leaving. 

3 — Water Draft Gauge, which is used for testing the 
draft of the chimney and flues. 

4 — Electric Recording Pyrometer, which is used for 
registering the higher temperatures of the flues and 
smoke pipe. 

5 — Hy grodeik, which measures the humidity in the air. 

The universal source of heat for heating purposes is derived 
from coal. First we must find the heating units in the coal used; 
these heating units are known as B. T. U. — British Thermal 
Units. 

One B. T. U. is the amount of heat necessary to raise the 
temperature of one pound of water one degree on the Fahrenheit 
scale. 

The number of B. T. U. per lb. in coal varies from 9000 to 
14500 B. T. U. 

A Calometer is employed to find the B. T. U. in the coal used. 

How the B. T. U. in Coal Are Determined 

A sample of coal to be tested is carefully weighed and thor- 
oughly dried, after the drying it is again weighed to determine 
the amount of moisture present. Then, the coal is pulverized, 
weighed accurately and placed in a metal cylinder. This 
cylinder is placed in a receptacle which contains a given amount 
of water; then this receptacle is thoroughly insulated to prevent 
the loss of heat from the water to the surrounding air. A 
thermometei is immersed in the water ; through an opening in 




Page Three 



THE PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY, DETROIT-CHICAGO 

the cover. This metal cyhnder is slowly rotated by means of a 
small motor during the test, and the paddle wheels on the side 
of the cylinder keep the water in motion so as to produce a 
uniform temperature. The pulverized coal is mixed with a 
chemical and ignited by means of a piece of hot metal or electric 
spark. The burning of the coal raises the temperature of the 
water which is recorded by the thermometer, then from this by 
a mathematical formula, the B. T. U. in the coal are figured. 

In making the test throughout a given number of days, an 
accurate record is kept of the amount of coal used, the volume 
of air passing through the furnace, and the rise in the tempera- 
ture of the air. When we know how much coal is used and its 
heating value per pound, how many cubic feet of air pass through 
the circulator and the temperature of the air entering the heater 
and the temperature when discharged, it becomes a mathematical 
problem to find out what percentage of the heating value of the 
coal consumed was absorbed by the air passing through the 
heater during the testing period. From the total B. T. U. of 
the fuel consumed we deduct the heat units transmitted to the air. 
The difference represents the loss which goes up the chimney. 



Reason Why You Should Install a Warm Air 
Circulator of Ample Capacity 

The main reason why an undersized circulator consumes more 
fuel than one of proper capacity is due to the excess amount of 
air entering it when operated at a high rate of combustion, oV 
in other words, it is being run above its maximum efficiency. 

Excess air only reduces the temperatures of the gases pro- 
duced by the burning fuel, thus reducing the temperature of the 
circulator. The heat absorbed by this excess air is carried away 
up the chimney and is a total loss. 

When you use a circulator with reserve capacity that does not 
have to be over-fired and pushed, you do away with this excess 
air and, consequently, get full results from the fuel consumed. 

In our experiments we have found the efficiency of a circu- 
lator to vary from 40 to 85 per cent, according to the rate of 
combustion with which it is operated. 

Remember The Harder You Push a Circulator the 
Less Efficient it is. 

Always install a Warm Air Circulator that ivill give 
you a margin of safety of 3,1 per cent. 



Page Four 




PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY. DETROIT-CHICAGO 

Performance Curves for Peninsular 
Warm Air Circulator 



Explaining the maximum efficiency of a warm air circulator. The maxi- 
mum or greatest efficiency of anything is that point where it produces the 
best results possible in proportion to the amount put in. So it is with the 
warm air circulator. There is a point where it gives the best results or pro- 
duces the most heat for the amount of coal used, and when the circulator is 
fired harder it may produce more heat but it uses far more fuel m proportion 
to the heat given than it should. This may be shown by so-called charac- 
teristic curves," the same as an electric motor, steam engine, etc., pertorm- 
ance is shown by "characteristic curves." The essential factors in obtaining 
the curves are as follows: (a) Rate of combustion (pounds of coal burned per 
square foot of grate surface per hour), (b) Efficiency of the circulator (ratio 
of heat put into air passing furnace to total heat value of coal burned, usually 
expressed as a percentage), (c) Capacity of circulator in B. T Ih per hour 
which is the heat put into the air passing the furnace, (d) Equivaleiit 
register temperature of air leaving register based upon 65 degrees Fahrenheit 
inlet temperature, (e) The draft at the smoke outlet m inches of water 
(water is placed in a U tube and this is connected to the smoke pipe by means 
of a hose. As the draft increases it relieves the pressure on one side ot water 
in the U tube and the water is lower on one side than the other m proportion 
to the strength of the draft). An inspection of the following figure will show 
the performance of a Peninsular circulator being tested for all combustion 
rates between 4>^ pounds of coal and 10 pounds of coal per square foot of 
grate surface. 

p£RFOffMANC£ CuffVES FOft p£N/NStJLAff WaPM AiR CiPCULATOR 

Showing Re fa f ion Bzfy^een Comb us f ion fCoa/ Burned) 
Rote and: 

(7) Efficiency Percent- 

(D tizoting Copacity - B.ta per Hr put into A/r ^ 



20 < fdOOOO 



Q) Eguiyafent Register Temperature 
@ Oraff -Inches fVateiLL 




Combustfon Rote - lb Coaf Burned per 5q. Ft Grate per Hr. 



The combustion rates are shown along the horizontal line at the bottom of 
the figure. With these curves it is a simple matter to see under what condi- 
tions a warm air circulator will develop its maximum efficiency. The vertical 
(dot and dash line A) is drawn through the point where the curve showing 
the efficiency (1) is the highest; this dot and dash line (A) will then cut all the 




Page five 



THE PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY, DEtROIT-CHICAG 

Other curves as follows: (1) Efficiency = 64 per cent. (2) Heating Capacity = 
120,000 British Thermal Units per hour. (3) Equivalent Outlet Register 
Temperature = 202 degrees Fahrenheit. (4) Draft in inches of water = 0.085, 
or almost one-tenth of an inch. (5) Rate of Combustion = 5 3/5 pounds of coal 
per square foot of grate per hour. The heating capacity just found in B. T. U. 
is not the greatest amount of heat this circulator will generate by any means, 
but is its capacity at maximum efficiency. The heating capacity of this cir- 
culator may be increased 50% if the chimney draft can be doubled. By in- 
creasing the draft to almost two-tenths of an inch and burning 9 pounds of 
coal per square foot of grate surface (as shown in dot and dash line B). You 
only get 55% efficiency or only 55% of the heat that is in the coal the circu- 
lator is burning. But the circulator generates 169,000 British Thermal Units 
per hour and the temperature at the register is 242 degrees Fahrenheit and 
the circular burning 9 pounds of coal per hour. Therefore, in short this per- 
formance shows why a warm air circulator should be installed plenty large 
enough to heat a house without being pushed for coal is wasted when circu- 
lator is run hard. It also shows that the average temperature at the register 
in zero weather should be about 202 and a circulator of the proper size should 
burn on the average of 5 3/5 pounds of coal per hour per square foot of grate 
surface. 



Chimney of Right Proportions is Most Essential to a Warm Air 

Circulator. 



Much time and money has been expended in designing and building im- 
proved types of warm air circulators which would make far greater economy 
in heating. It would be no more than fair that architects and builders do 
their part in furnishing proper chimney flues. A warm air circulator is likened 
to a human being, it has to have oxygen to burn and you shut off or decrease 
the oxygen and it will soon die out. Each atom of carbon requires for perfect 
combustion two atoms of oxygen. When this union is effected it burns to 
carbon dioxide and yields per pound of coal 14,500 B, T. U. (heat units). If, 
however, through insufficient air supply there is but one atom of oxygen to 
one of carbon the result is carbon-monoxide, giving only 4,500 B. T. U., or 
less than one-third the heat given off when combustion is perfect, and com- 
bustion can not be perfect unless there is a perfect chimney that has the 
strength to pull the oxygen into the coal which is called draft. With a weak 
draft or too little air passing through the coal, the fire has no life. It is just 
red and not a real white heat and in such a case more fuel is burned but with 
nowhere near the heat. A warm air circulator itself has no draft. It may 
have been installed perfectly and yet it might consume an unreasonable 
amount of fuel for the heat given off with a poor draft. 

The best flue is a round one as smoke always travels in a circular motion 
and in a round flue there are no dead air spaces. The next best is the square 
8x8 flue or any square size. The poorest is the rectangular flue. A 4 x 12 
flue has no advantage over a 4x4 inch flue as the smoke rising in a circular 
motion leaves dead air space in the ends which tends to a down draft. 

One of the greatest complaints in chimneys is where there are two flues, 
one for a fire place, the other for the circulator, where there is no division wall 
from the fire place to the basement — a back draft is caused which retards 
the draft, making it impossible for the circulator to heat properly. 



Page Six 




rHE PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY. DETROIT-CHICAGO 

To avoid any chance of this, extend the circular flue to a point just below 
where the smoke pipe enters and in no case leaving more space than sufficient 
to accommodate a 2 inch by 8 inch clean out door and end there with a piece 
of iron for a bottom, cemented all around so as to be absolutely air tight, 
this will make sure of no back draft between the two flues, caused by a poorly 
built chimney. 

Rate of Combustion 

It has been shown repeatedly in tests of Peninsular warm air circulators 
that the proper rate of combustion should be based on the burning of five 
and three-quarters pounds of coal per square foot of grate surface. This 
rate of combustion is for heating with the outside temperature at zero. In 
giving the square inches of pipe area heating capacity of ah our furnaces, it 
is based on this rate of combustion. Our guarantee of ratings is made, pro- 
vided a sufficient area of piping is installed for each room and the piping 
properly run. 

Of course, it must be understood that this rate of combustion is for zero 
weather and as the average outside temperature through the winter runs very 
much above this, you can see that the average rate of combustion will be far 
less than this. On some testings run through a winter, it ran as low as two 
pounds of coal per square foot of grate surface. The square feet of grate 
surface of all our warm air circulators is shown in the dimensions directly 
underneath the cut of the circulator. With this information you can judge 
the amount of coal that would be consumed by each respective circulator. 



Arriving at Proper Pipe Area 

The rule for finding out the proper size pipe for a room of given size is very 
simple and is worked out on the following page. In short the rule is this: 
In the first part, find the number of square feet of glass surface and equiva- 
lent glass surface. (Equivalent glass surface is the wall surface divided by 10.) 

We know that one square foot of glass surface cools 75 cubic feet of air 
per hour. This way we can teU how many cubic feet of air is cooled, and 
in the last part of the rule find the cubic feet of air in the room to 
be heated so the air in the room and what is cooled has to be heated. When 
this is found nmltiply by .01222 and it gives the number of square inches of 
pipe area necessary. The number of square inches of pipe area in different 
pipes will be found on page eleven. 



EXAMPLE 

Living room required 78 sq. inches = 10" pipe 

Dining room required 64 sq. inches = 9" pipe 

Kitchen room required 64 sq. inches = 9" pipe 

3 bed rooms required, 64" each. 192 sq. inches = 3 ' 9" pipe 



It is shown that it will take 398 square inches pipe area to heat the house. 
Turn to catalogue page 33 and find the 22-B circulator that will take care of 
430 square inches which is the proper one to use. 




Page Seven 



THE PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY. DETROIT-CHICAGO 

Full Rule for Determining Heat Requirements 

1. Find the total square feet of glass surface in windows and outside doors, 
taking the full opening measurements and counting outside doors as all glass ; 
then measure the surface in exposed outside wall, from which subtract the 
glass surface; next reduce the wall surface to equivalent glass surface bv di- 
viding the net amount by: 

Ten if wall is 8 to 10 inches thick. 
Fifteen if wall is 12 to 26 inches thick. 
Twenty if wall is 26 to 38 inches thick. 

To this result add the glass exposure; then as one square foot of glass surface 
cools 75 cubic feet of air per hour, multiply the total glass equivalent by 75, 
which will give the total cubic feet of air to be heated to offset the loss from 
glass and wall exposure. This total added to the cubical contents of space to 
be heated gives the amount of air to be heated. 

2. For a temperature of 70 degrees Fahr. in zero weather, multiply the 
amount of air to be heated by .01222, and the result will be the heat require- 
ments in square inches pipe area. For each degree below zero for which the 
heating is required, add 1 per cent, to the heat requirements. 

This rule gives the total heat requirements of the room in square inches pipe 
area; and judgment must be used in increasing the number of square inches 
pipe area in the rooms on the cold side, exposed to the north and west, and 
reducing the number of square inches pipe area on the warm side; also making 
allowance for poorly constructed buildings, loose-fitting windows, etc. 

Add the square inches pipe area of all the rooms and choose heater of such 
capacity as the result indicates. 

Showing Rule in Use 

PROBLEM: 

io)^^n/*^ ^'•\*^^ *^*'^* requirements in square inches pipe area of a room 12' x 
18 X 9 , with four windows, 3' x 5K' each, with two outside walls 10" thick- 
heating required for 10 degrees below zero? 

ANSWER: 

Square feet of glass surface, 3 x 5^ x 4 = 66. 

Square feet of outside wall surface, 12 + 18 = 30 x 9 = 270. 

Net wall surface exposed, 270 — 66 = 204. 

Equivalent glass surface in wall exposure, 204 -=-10 =20. 

Amount of air cooled by glass and wall surface, 20 +66 = 86 x 75 = 6450 

Cubical contents of room 12 ' x 18 ' x 9 ' = 1944. 

Total cubic feet of air to be heated, 6450 + 1944 = 8394. 

Heat requirements in sq, in. pipe area for zero weather, 8394 x .01222 = 102. 

Heat requirements for 10° below zero, 102+8 = 110 sq. in. pipe area. 

*Nole: The co-efficient or factor .01222+, which we advise using, as per 
rule, IS derived from the following formula: 

H x 55 X 144 

H. S.=— - = .01222 + 

60 X 3 X 3600 

In the above formula H. S. = Area of heat stack in square inches. 

H. = Heat loss from room in B. T. U. per hour. 
55 = Number of degrees through which one cubic 
I foot of air can be heated by one B. T. U. 

144 = Number of sq. in. in one sq. ft. 
60 = Average diff'erence in temperature between air 
j leaving register and room temperature. 

3 == Average velocity in feet per second of air in 
heat stack to first floor rooms. 
3600 = Number of seconds in one hour. 



Page Light 




HE PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY, DETROIT-CHICAGO 



Rules for Pipes 

1. Each warm air pipe should have an upward pitch from the heater of not 
less than 1 inch per foot. 

2. The pitch of all warm air pipes should be alike. Equalize by bringing 
down lower into the cellar the boxes of the shorter warm air pipes. 

3. The table of warm air piping in this formula applies where cellar or base- 
ment pipes are not over 15 feet in length. 

4. When a warm air pipe in cellar is more than 15 ft. long, add 1 in. to the 
diameter of such pipe for each 5 ft. or part thereof, of length in excess of 15 ft.. 

5. An offset in the riser pipe is equivalent to an addition to the length of 
the cellar pipe, and should be counted in when measuring the total length of 
the cellar pipe. 

6. AH warm air pipes in cellar or basement should be covered with non- 
heat conducting pipe covering. Not less than 10-lb, sheathing is recommended. 

7. All warm air risers should be carried up in inside partitions, wherever 
possible. 

8. In cases where it is absolutely necessary to carry up warm air risers in 
outer walls, such risers should be so thoroughly protected as to be completely 
insulated. 

9. In using double wall pipe the capacity should not be reduced. 

10. A separate compartment should be made in the crown or bonnet of the 
surface for each extra long or winding air pipe, thus insuring a positive supply 
of warm air to that pipe. 

11. Never use smaller than eight (8) inch pipe* 

12. When warm air pipes are taken out of the top of the bonnet of the 
heater, the tops of all the elbows should be on a level, so that an equal current 
of air can fill all the pipes. 

Notei As a 12-inch elbow is so much higher than an 8-inch elbow, in order 
to have both pipes work properly, the top of the 8-inch elbow should be as 
high as the top of the 12-inch. This applies to all pipes taken from the top 
of the heater. The same rule applies as nearly as possible where pipes are 
taken from the side of the bonnet. 

13. Rooms on the sides of the house exposed to pre vaihng winds should 
always have one size larger pipes and registers than the same sized rooms on 
the sides of the house not so exposed. 

14. Rooms having bay windows and considerable more than the average 
glass surface on the northern side of the house, should have two sizes larger 
warm air pipes and registers than the same sized rooms without this extra 
glass surface on the southern side. 

15. Where warm air pipes pass through the wall in the cellar, an air space 
around the pipes should always be left. Never mason a pipe in solid that passes 
through a waU in the cellar, as the wall chills the pipe and makes that pipe 
almost worthless. 

16. All warm air pipes should have dampers close to the heater, so the heat 
from them can be regulated. 

17. All rising pipes in partitions or walls should be enlarged or boxed out 
where cellar pipes enter them. This is necessary to avoid friction and insure a 
rapid flow of air. 

18. All rising warm air pipes running from second to third floor should 
always have damper above the register on second floor. Rising pipes should 
be wrapped with asbestos and studs lined with tin, using wire or iron lath to 
plaster on. 

19. The friction from abrupt bends or acute angles in warm air pipes must 
be avoided. 




Page Nine 



THE PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY. DETROIT-CHICAGO 

• ^u * ^' o^P^^?^^/'^ ^.^^V^^ ^^""^^S flues 12 " X 12 ^ which is equal to 144 square 
inches, or 8 x 12 ", which is equal to 96 square inches, or 8 " x 8 ", which is equal 
to 64 square inches, will in cold or windy weather pull off more air from a room 
than the warm air pipes can deliver. In such cases, use sheet-iron throat pieces 
with sliding damper in fireplace flue. The ventilation can thus be regulated 
as desired. ® 

21. In heating a room on the cold side of the house, or a room having a large 
amount of glass surface, place one register in the floor as near as possible to the 
turnace and place a cold air register face in the floor under or near a window and 
connect this cold air register by means of a separate duct to the bottom of 
casing, thus removing the cold air out of the room and at the same time pro- 
vidmg a flow of warm air into the room. 

^^:u T^%H^^^^- must be attached to a chimney flue of correct construction 
one that will furnish sufficient draft to insure a good combustion of fuel, 

23. The fresh air supply to the heater must be adequate. 

Pipe and Register Sizes 

The table below is printed in order that installers may be able to see at a 
glance equivalent areas of round pipes, flat register pipes, risers and registers. 

Risers to rooms above the first floor should be large enough to supply to the 
room to be heated the proper volume of warm air. 

On account of this increasing velocity on the upper floors of a residence 
smaller pipes can be used than those to the first floor, but the necessary free air 
opening into the upper rooms must not be overlooked. 

Table Two 
(All measurements in inches) 

Diameter Area Size Size Size Sizp 

of Round of Pipe Flat Riser Side Wall Round Floor RecLFloor 

I'lpe bq. In. Pipe Register Register Register 

8 50 3Kxl4 8x12 12 8x12 

9 64 4 xl6 10x12 14 10x12 

10 78 4 x20 12x12 14 10x16 

11 95 6 xl6 12x15 16 12x15 

12 113 6 xl9 14x15 18 12x20 

13 132 6 x22 14x18 18 14x18 

14 154 8 xl9 16x18 20 14x22 

15 176 8 x22 16x20 24 16x20 

16 201 8 x25 18x20 24 16x24 
II 227 10 x23 18x24 24 18x24 

18 254 10 x26 20x24 24 18x27 

19 283 12 x24 20x26 28 20x26 

20 314 12 x26 22x26 28 20x30 

21 346 12 x29 24x27 30 22x30 

22 380 14 x27 24x30 30 24x30 

23 415 14 x30 27x27 30 24x32 

24 452 14 x32 28x28 36 24x36 

Table of Averages 

If it is desired to ascertain the approximate size of pipe required to heat a 
given roona without figuring the rule shown on page nine, but only taking into 
consideration the dimensions of the room, the foUowing table may be used 
which under ordinary circumstances runs very close. 

Table Three~Wm. G. Snow 
Table on next page shows the proper size of furnace pipes (the lower number 
shows the size pipe for first floor, the upper number the size pipe for second 
lloor j to heat rooms of various dimensions, when two sides are exposed tem- 
perature at Register 140 degrees. Room 70 degrees. Outside zero, Rooms 8 to 
17 leet m width, assumed to be 9 feet high. Rooms 18 to 20 feet in width 
assumed to be 10 feet high. For other heights, temperatures or exposures 
make a suitable allowance. When first floor pipes are longer than 15 feet use 
one size larger than that stated. 



Page Ten 




IE PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY. DETROIT-CHICAGO 



Width of Room in Feet 





8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 1 


19 1 


20 


8 8 X 
8 8 8 






















8 8 
9 8 8 






















8 8 8 
10 8 8 8 






















8 8 8 
11 8 8 8 


8 
9 




















8 8 A8 
X12 8 8 X9 


8 
9 


8 
9 


















8 8 8 
13 8 9 9 


8 8 

9 9 


8 
10 
















8 8 8 8 8 
14 9 9 9 9 10 


8 
10 


8 

10 














8 8 8 8 8 
15 9 9 9 10 10 


8 

10 


9 
10 


9 

10 












t>~ 8 8 8 8 8 
« 16 9 9 10 10 10 


9 9 
10 10 


9 
11 


9 

11 










fi 8 8 8 9 
- 17 10 10 10 10 


9 9 
10 11 


9 
11 


9 
11 


9 
11 








S 8 8 9 9 
§ 18 10 10 10 10 


9 9 
11 11 


9 
11 


9 
11 


10 10 
12 12 






P5 1 9 9 
'S 19 1 10 10 


9 
11 


9 9 
11 11 


9 
11 


10 
12 


10 10 
12 12 


10 
12 




J 9 

ti) 20 10 


9 
11 


9 
11 


9 9 
11 11 


10 
12 


10 
12 


10 10 
12 12 


11 

13 


11 
13 


J 21 


9 

11 


9 
11 


9 10 
11 12 


10 
12 


10 10 11 
12 12 13 


11 
13 


11 
13 


22 


9 
11 


9 
11 


10 10 
12 12 


10 
12 


10 
12 


10 11 
13 13 


11 
13 


11 
13 


23 










10 
12 


10 10 
12 12 


10 
12 


10 
13 


10 
13 


11 
13 


11 

13 


11 
13 


24 






10 
12 


10 10 10 
12 12 13 


10 
13 


10 
13 


11 
13 


11 

13 


11 
13 


25 








10 10 10 
12 13 13 


10 
13 


10 

13 


11 

13 


11 

13 


12 
14 


26 








10 10 10 
13 13 13 


10 

13 


11 
13 


11 
13 


12 
14 


12 
14 


27 








10 10 11 
13 13 13 


11 
13 


12 
14 


12 
14 


12 
14 


28 1 








10 11 11 
13 13 13 


11 
13 


12 
14 


12 

14 


12 
14 


29 






11 11 
13 13 


11 
13 


12 
14 


12 

14 


12 
14 


30 






_ _ 


11 11 
13 13 


12 

14 


12 12 
14 14 


12 
14 



FOR EXAMPLE— A room 12 feet in length and 10 feet wide on first floor 
would take 9 inch pipe marked X the size of second floor pipe 8 inch marked A. 




Page Eleven 



THE PENINSULAR STOVE COMPAN 



DETROIT -CHICA 



One 12 " pipe equals two 9 " pipes 
One 13" pipe equals two 10" pipes 
One 14" pipe equals two 11" pipes 
One 15" pipe equals two 12" pipes 
One 16" pipe equals two 12" pipes 
One 17" pipe equals two 13" pipes 

For third floor use one size smaller than for second floor. 

For rooms with three exposures increase pipe given in table in proportion 
to the exposure. 

For halls use pipe of ample size to allow for loss of heat to second floor. 

First Floor Pipe and Sizes of Risers 

Installers of warm air heaters must lend their aid in persuading architects 
and builders, as well as the owners, to consider carefully the proper size of 
risers within the walls in order that the ultimate installation will not be handi- 
capped by too small an area in such risers. 









Registers 












Tabic Four 










(All 


measurements in inches) 








Register 




Register Sizes 




Register Sizes 


loiind 




Sizes Floor 


Free Air 


Raseboard, 


Free Air 


Baseboard 


Pipe 


Cross Sec. 


and Plain 


Opening 


1st Floor 


Opening 


2d and 3d Free Air 






Side Wall 


Sq. In. 


Only 


Sq. In. 


Floor, In. Opening 


8 


50.27 


8x 12 


52.90 


7x 12 


53.20 


8x10 49.50 


y 


63.61 


10 X 12 


66.47 


8x 13 


64.40 


8 X 12 59 65 


10 


78.54 


12x14 


83.03 


10 X 12 


75.00 


9x12 66.16 


11 


95.03 


12 X 15 


89.04 


10 X 14 


87.71 




12 


113.09 


14 X 16 


111.07 


12 X 14 


105.51 




13 


132.73 


14x18 


125.10 








14 


153.93 


16x20 


172.00 








15 


176.71 


18x20 


193.85 








16 


201.06 


20x20 


215.70 









Chimney Flue 

After the proper size warm air circulator has been determined, the proper size 
of chimney flue may be determined by referring to Table Five, which follows: 







Table Five 




Diameter 

Round Chimney 

Flue 


Size 

Square Chimney 

Flue 


Size 
Rectangular CWmuey 


Height of Chimney 
Fhie Above 


Inches 


Inches 


Inches 


Feet 


8 


7Hx 7}4 


6x10 


30 


9 


8Kx S}4 


8x 10 


32 


10 


9Kx 9K 


8x 12 


34 


11 


lOKx 10>^ 


10 x 12 


36 


12 


llKxllK 


10 X 14 


38 


13 


12^xl2>^ 


12 X 14 


40 


14 


13K X 13K 


12 X 16 


40 


15 


14>^ X 14>^ 


14 X 16 


40 


16 


15K X 15K 


14 X 18 


40 


17 


16K X 16K 


14x20 


40 


18 


17Kxl7>^ 


16x20 


40 


19 


18Kx 18K 


16x22 


40 


20 


19K X 19K 


18x22 


40 



Page Twclv 



Above Measurements Arc Inside Dimension 




HE PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY. PETROIT-CHICAGO 



Directions and Rules for Cold Air Supply 

1. The cold air supply to the heater must be adequate. 

2. Always bring in the cold air from the coldest side of the house — West, 
Northwest, or North. 

3. Cold air boxes, when the air supply is taken from the outside, should be 
equal to four-fifths (4/5) of the total warm air pipe capacity. When air is taken 
from the inside of the house, the cold air opening into the heater should be of 
equal capacity to all of the warm air pipes. 

4. Do not take cold air direct from outside to the heater from East or 
South. When this is done, it will be noted that warm air frequently comes out 
of the cold air box or the heater seems to be breathing, A current of warm 
air will pass up thru the pipes and then suddenly stop, and the air will suck 
down the register. This condition can be easily overcome by the use of what 
is called a cold air room, or air supply chamber. The best results are always 
obtained by taking the cold air from the inside of the house. 

5. A cold air pit under the heater should never be more than 14 inches 
deep. A pier in center is desirable to support ash pit where necessary. When 
more than one air opening, put partition across pit. 

6. The cold air box opening into casing of heater should never be higher 
than the total height of ash pit and should enter the heater from the rear to 
obtain the best results. 

7. Cold air box should have closing damper near opening, also a connecting 
cold air pipe from the main hall. This is suggested in order to admit air during 
the night or during extreme weather. Inside air supply should be parallel 
and separate. 

8. In connecting cold air box with heater, it is always most desirable to 
make the connection in the rear of the heater, or when two cold airs from in- 
side are used connect one on each side. 

9. Heaters must have and will have air, and this air should be supplied 
from the cold air opening at the bottom of the casing. The top of any cold air 
opening should never be above the level of the grate. 

10. The size of the cold air boxes and cold air base plates which supply the 
heater when taken from a main hall or other room down to the heater, should 
always have the full capacity of all the pipes combined. 

Heat Value and Composition of 
Various Fuels 



Name of Comhustihle 

Carbon 

Anthracite Coal 

Bituminous 

Lignite 

Peat 

Peat 0.30 Water 

Coke. 

Peat — Charcoal 

Dry Wood 

Wood 0.20 Water 

Wood — Charcoal 

Hydrogen 

Carbonic Oxide 

Illuminating Gas 

Gas from Blast Furnace . 





Composition 




Calorific 












c 


n 


Volatile 
Matter 


Aah 


B. T. U. 


1. 00 








14,400 


0.90 


0.03 


0.03 


0.01 


13,500 


0.85 


0.05 


0.06 


0.06 


14,400 


0.70 


0.05 


0.20 


0.05 


11,700 


0.55 


0.05 


0.30 


O.IO 


9,000 


0.39 


0.04 


0.05 


0.07 


7,200 


0.85 


0.05 




0.10 


12,600 


0.82 






0.18 


9,000 


0.48 


0.06 


0.05 


0.01 


7,200 


0.40 


0.05 


0.25 


0.01 


5,400 


0.80 


1^00 


0.04 


0.07 


10,800 
62,000 


0.43 




0.57 




4,320 


0.62 


6.2i 


0.17 




18,000 


0.06 


0.02 


0.92 




1,620 



Note: Above information is quoted from standard authorities, 
guaranteed. 



Not 




Page Thirteen 



THE PENINSULAR STOVE COMPAN 



DETROIT -CH ICA 



Approximate Volume to which 1 cu. ft. of air at 0° will expand when heated 
to the temperatures stated in the table. Volume of air at 0° equals 1 cu. ft. 



Volume When Heated to 



Deg. 

10.. 

20.. 
30.. 
40.. 
50.. 
60.. 
70.. 
80.. 
90.. 
100.. 



Cu. Ft. 



. equal 
.equal 
. equal 
. equal 
. equal 
. equal 
.equal 
. equal 
. equal 
. equal 



1.02 
1.04 
1.06 



09 
10 
13 
15 
17 



1.20 

1.22 



Volume When Heated to 



Deg. 
110.. 

120.. 
130.. 
140.. 
150.. 
200.. 
300.. 
400.. 
500.. 



Cu. Ft. 



equal 




24 


equal 




26 


equal 




28 


equal 




30 


equal 




33 


equal 




44 


equal 




65 


equal 




87 


equal 


2 


09 



Weight of Dry Air per Cubic Foot at Different Temperatures 



Temp. 
Deg. F. 



Wt. of i 
cu. ft. 
ill lbs. 



0.0864 

12....... 0.0842 

22 0.0824 

32 0.0807 

42 0.0791 

52 0.0776 

62 0.0761 

72 0.0747 

82 0.0733 

92 0.0720 

102 0.0707 



Temp. 
Deg. F. 



Wt. of 1 
cu. ft. 
in lbs. 



112 0.0694 

122 0.0682 

132.. 0.0671 

142 0.0660 

152 0.0649 

162 0.0638 

172 0.0628 

182 0.0618 

192 0.0609 

202 0.0600 

212 0.0591 



Testing Installations 

Completed installations may be tested at any time of year by means of the 
following table of outside and inside temperatures (Carpenter). 

To Equal a Temperature of 70° Fahrenheit in Zero Weather 

li is necessary to maintain 
If outside temperature is— inside temperature of— 

10 below zero, Fahrenheit 64 above zero, Fahrenheit 

zero, Fahrenheit 70 above zero, Fahrenheit 

10 above zero, Fahrenheit 75 above zero, Fahrenheit 

20 above zero, Fahrenheit. 81 above zero, Fahrenheit 

30 above zero, Fahrenheit 85 above zero, Fahrenheit 

40 above zero, Fahrenheit 90 above zero, Fahrenheit 

50 above zero, Fahrenheit 98 above zero, Fahrenheit 

60 above zero, Fahrenheit 104 above zero, Fahrenheit 

70 above zero, Fahrenheit UO above zero, Fahrenheit 

80 above zero, Fahrenheit I17 above zero, Fahrenheit 

90 above zero, Fahrenheit 123 above zero, Fahrenheit 



Page Fourteen 




THE P E N I N 



S U L A R STOVE COMPANY. DETROIT-CHICAGO 



Showing Faulty Chimneys and Why They 
Don't Work 




Brick and Leaky Top. Louk Narrow Stove Clean-out 

Mortar ill Chimney Flue. Bottom, Connected Door 

Chimney Proper kind to Chimney Open in 

Flue Square Flue Basement 






1 — Shows smoke pipe not in far enough and a hole all around 
smoke pipe. 

2 — Shows proper way with smoke pipe in far enough and 
cemented tight. 

3 — Smoke pipe shoved in too far. 





1 — Chimney lower than roof, causing down draft. 

2 — Tree higher than chimney causing down draft. 

3— Showing two flues, one for furnace, one for fireplace, with 
no dividing wall from fireplace to bottom. These flues should 
be absolutely independent. 




Page Fifteen 



THE PENINSULAR STOVE CO MP ANY, DETROIT-CHICAGC 




Cutaway view showing how a Penin- 
sular Pipe Warm Air Circulator looks 
installed. This view shows a warm air 
pipe to every room and two cold air 
returns; one entering on either side 
of the circulator which makes perfect 
circulation and an evenly healed house. 



Page Sixteen 




THE PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY, DETROIT-CHICAGO 



Peninsular Hot Blast Warm Air Circulator 

Series 8840 - 8844 - 8848 - 8854 

Extra Heavy All Cast Iron Constriiciion 

Built especially for soft coal, but will burn any kind of fuel. 
The largest All-Cast Warm Air Circulator made. 



Construction Features 



ONE PIECE 
HEAVY CAST 
RON BASE 




One Piece, Heavy Cast Iron Base Used in Peninsular 
Warm Air Circulators 





Peninsular Extra Deep Cup Joint at Base 



This Peninsular cup joint used on all parts of all our Warm 
Air Circulators is a positive guarantee against any gas or dust 
leaking through the joints; when the cement in these joints has 
dried they are as tight as if welded. 




Page Seventeen 



THE PENINSULAR 



^"^°^^ COMPANY. DET ROI T-C H . CAG 



Peninsular Duplex Grate Used in 8840 Series 




Is unquestionably the strong-' 
est, simplest, as well as the most 
efficient grate made. The Annu- 
lar Shaking Ring rests on extra 
large ball bearings, and regardless 
of the amount of fuel or fire in 
the firepot, can be easily operat- 
ed so as to work any ashes from 
the outside edge of the fire pot 
into the ash pit, and any clinkers 
into the Duplex section where it 
can be removed by one operation 
of the Duplex Grate without los- 
ing any of the burning coal, thus leaving the live fire next to 
the lire pot, which greatly increases the efficiency of the heater. 
Entire grate and frame is portable, and can easily be removed 
through ash pit door by pulling it out on tracks provided for the 




purpose without removmg a single plate or bolt. Ash pit is large 
enough for a man to enter when necessary to make repairs in the 
interior of the circulator, without taking it down 




Page Eighteen 



FHE PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY 



DETROIT-CHICAGO 




Peninsular Fire Pots 

Fire Pots are made in two sections, with a deep cup joint in the 
center allowing for expansion and contraction where it is neces- 
sary. Walls are made straight and are deeper than other circu- 
lators on the market. They are almost as large at the bottom as 
at the top. In almost every other make you will find the walls 
slant and the fire pot contracts very much at the bottom. 

A 22-inch Peninsular fire pot holds as much fuel as a 24-inch pot 
of other manufacturers on account of its depth and straight walls 
of the fire pot. 





The Peninsular Way No, 1 



The Other Way No, 2 



Some fire pots are made extremely large across the top and 
small across the bottom, and cannot be used for accurate com- 
parison as shown in above cut. 

Suppose, in the illustration, that the pots are both 24 inches 
across the top; the first is 22 inches and the second 16 inches in 
diameter at the bottom, the first will supply 50% more heat than 
the second. 




Page Nineteen 



THE PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY 



DETROIT-CH ICAGC 



Peninsular Hot Blast 

Which is furnished with the 8840 Series, is the simplest and 
most effective way known to modern furnace builders to burn 
all classes of soft coal with cleanliness and without smoke. 

It has two supply inlets to which air is forced into the hot 
blast chamber, formed by a hollow cast ring which completely 
encircles the top of the fire pot. This ring is securely mounted 




Peninsular Hot Blast 



and bolted to bottom of feed section, making it impossible for 
any leakage of gas or air that would interfere with receiving the 
full benefit of the ''Hot Blast" principle of burning smoke and 
carbonous gases which exist to a great extent in all bituminous 
coal. 

Heated to a great degree, the air rushes through the perfora- 
tions in ring into fire chamber and mixes with the carbon or coal 
gas, causing so complete a combustion that the smoke and fuel 
are all consumed with no waste. Each hole throws a jet of 
flame 6 inches to 8 inches long as if it were a gas ring. 




Page Twenty 



THE PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY. DETROIT-CHICAGO 




Feed Section or Combustion Dome 

The purpose of this section, as its name impHes, is to aid in 
the complete combustion of fuel. To make this possible^ in 
Peninsular Furnaces, they are liberally proportioned in size, 
each part being made large to enable the gases and fuel products 
to perfectly mix and ignite. 

You will notice how the hot blast ring is built onto the feed 
section. It is on the outside of the casting and, consequently, 
will never burn out. 




Broken view showing action of Dust Flue and Dust Flue 
Damper used when shaking down fire 




Page Twenty-one 



T 



THE PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY, DETROlT-CHl 



CAST IRON RADIATOR 



DEEP CUP JOINT 




CL|AN OUT DOOR 



Peninsular All-Cast Iron Radiator 

Used Exclusively on the 88W Series, Built Especially for 
Soft Coal. The Largest All-Cast Radiator Made. 
A Distinctive Peninsular Product 

It is conceded there is nothing that will withstand the action 
of heat (with the exception of fire brick) like Genuine Peninsular 
Pen-Puri Iron, consequently it is the best material to give the 
user lasting service. 

The immense amount of iron properly distributed in this 
heater when heated, forms a radiating surface of great capacity 
Bnd insures a minimum fuel consumption. 

The castings are of the same perfection of quality 
as are used in the manufacture of Peninsular 
Stoves and Ranges. 

New Oxidized Finish Draft Regulator 

Is furnished with every Peninsular Warm Air 
Circulator. This Regulator should be attached to 
wall at some convenient place on first floor. From 
this Regulator chains run to the basement and are 
attached to the draft door and check damper in the 
8840 Series. They are also attached to the Hot 
Blast Draft. This enables the operator to adjust 
the dampers from the first floor or basement, doing 
away with the necessity of going up and down stairs. 



A Peninsular 
Air Humidifier 

is furnished with 
every warm air 
circulator. No 
dried out parched 
air with a Penin- 

Peninsular sular. 
Furnace 

Regulator 




Peninsular Air Humidifier 



Page Twenty-two 




E PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY, DETROIT-CHICAGO 




Peninsular Gas Ring 

Can be aliached to any of our Warm Air Circulators. Is con- 
structed to produce the greatest amount of heat from the least 
amount of gas. With our Gas Ring the grate complete is left in, 
no change being necessary to burn either coal or natural gas, a 
very desirable feature in cold weather when the gas gives out. 
This ring is also very handy to start the fire with, does away 
with all bother of kindling, etc. Can be used economically for 
this purpose with artificial gas. 




Page Twenty -three 



THE PENINSULAR STOVE C 



OMPANY. DETROIT-CHICAGO 



CAST IRON RADIATOR 



DEEP CUP JOINTS 



CLEAN OUT DOOR 




BALL BEARING 

ANNULAR 
SHA>MNG RING 



^MASSIVE 
CAST IRON 
GRATE FRAME 



Sectional View of Peninsular Hot Blast All Cast 
Iron Warm Air Circulator 

Series 8840 - 8814 - 8848 - 8854 

With Hot Blast Smoke Consumer for Soft Coal 
Burns All the Smoke 



Page Twenty-four 




THE PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY, DETROIT-CHICAGO 




Peninsular Hot Blast All Cast Iron Warm 
Air Circulator 

Series 8840 - 8844 - 8848 - 8854 

Built especially for Soft Coal. Will burn Hard Coal, Coke, 
Wood or Natural Gas with equal success 

ITEM 8840 8844 8848 8854 

Inside Diameter Fire Pot at Top 18 H* 20 H " 22 J^ " 25 J.^ * 

Depth of Fire Pot 18 ' 18 " 19 " 20 " 

Inside Diameter Fire Pot at Grate 15 H * 17 " 19 " 22 ' 

Diameter of Radiator 35 " 36 " 39 ^4 " 41 ' 

Height of Radiator 14 ^ * 16 " 18" 20" 

Height of Circulator 50 " 53 " 55 " 57 " 

Diameter of Casing 41 " 42 " 44 " 47 " 

Height of Casing 64 " 67 " 68 " 70 " 

Diameter of Smoke Collar 9" 9" 9" 9" 

Heating Capacity in Cubic Feet. . 15,000 20,000 30,000 40,000 

Heating Capacity, Square Inches Pipe Area. . 410 475 560 720 

Size of Feed Door 11x13^ llxl3H 113^2x13^ ll^^xlS^^ 

Grate Area, Square Feet IK 1% 2 M 3 

Slupping Weight 1125 1291 1475 1815 

Hot water coil for domestic purposes may be had in all sizes 
See Price List for prices 




Page Twenty-five 



THE PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY, DETROIT-CHICAGO 

AH Peninsulars Are Set Up and 
Inspected Before Shipping 



ilii 




Every Peninsular Warm Air Circulator is fitted with as much 
care as our Base Burners or Ranges, and set up complete in our 
factory. 

It is then carefully inspected, dismounted, packed and crated 
for shipment. 

This extra operation costs us thousands of dollars a year. 

When you happen to be out in the country with only a hammer 
and screw driver, a Warm Air Circulator that goes together with- 
out filing or fitting will be appreciated and will save you money. 

A Peninsular can be put up easily as every part fits. No 
filing or grinding as it is all done at the factory. When you buy 
insist on an assembled circulator. 



Page Twenty -Six 




THE PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY, 



DETROIT-CHICAGO 



Peninsular Hot Blast Warm Air Circulator 

Series 9940 - 9944 - 9948 - 9954 - 9960 

Built Especially for Soft Coal, and will Burn Hard Coal, Coke or Natural Gas 

In the 9940 Series Peninsular Warm Air Circulator are em- 
bodied all the features shown in the 8840 Series, except that the 
9940 Series has a very heavy steel Radiator that is lined at the 
hottest points with cast iron, and for a combination Circulator 
for both soft and hard coal can not be excelled. 

For a description of all the parts of the 9940 Series, including 
Ash Pit, Grates, Fire Pot, Feed Section, Hot Blast Ring, see 
pages 16 to 24. This Circulator is the same as the 8840 Series 
with but one exception and that is a Steel Radiator in place of 
a Cast Radiator. The Hot Blast Ring that is on the 8840 and 
9940 Series furnace is patented and not found on any other 
Circulator. For instance, if you look through the Water Coil 
Holes just after you have put hard coal on and notice the fire 
before opening the Hot Blast Tubes and then the second they 
are opened a jet of green flame will come from each hole 6 in. to 
8 in. long. With soft coal the flame is red, showing that with this 
patented attachment all the gases that would otherwise go up 
the chimney unburned are turned into heat, thereby saving a 
great quantity of coal. 



Sectional View of Steel Radiator 




1— Inner and outer steel. 

2 — Cast iron radiator top. 

3 — Deep cut joints. 

4 — Heavy bolts holding radiator together. 

5 — Black asbestos furnace cement. 



After the radiator is mounted as shown, the cement in the deep 
cup joints hardens and being held with the heavy rods, it is more 
solid than if welded together — absolutely no chance of dust or gas 
leakage. 




Page Twenty-seven 



THE PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY. DETROIT-CHICAGO 




Peninsular Hot Blast Warm Air Circulator 

Series 9940 - 9944 - 9948 - 9954 - 9960 

Built especially for Soft Coal and Will Burn Hard Coal, Coke, 
Wood or Natural Gas with equal success 

ITEM 9940 9944 9948 9954 9960 

Inside Diameter Fire Pot at Top 18 J^ " 20 3/^ ' 22 H * 25 * i " 27 ' i ' 

Depth Fire Pot 18" 18" 19" 20" 22" 

Inside Diameter Fire Pot at Grate 1^14" 17" 19" 22" 25" 

Diameter Radiator 35 " 36 " 38 " 40 " 51 " 

Height Radiator 18" 18" 18" 19" 20" 

Height of Circulator 50 " 53 " 55 " 57 " 61 " 

Diameter Casing . 41 " 42 " 44 " 47 " 60 " 

Height Casing 64 " 67 " 68 " 70 " 73 " 

Diameter Smoke Collar 9 " 10 " 10 " 10 " 10 " 

Heating Capacity, Cubic Feet 15,000 20,000 30,000 40,000 55,000 

Heating Capacity, Sq. In. Pipe Area .... 410 475 560 720 875 

Size of Feed Door 11x13 H Hxl3 H 11 Mxl3 J^ 11 >^xl3 H 11 J.^xl3 U 

(irate Area, Square Feet 1 J^ 1% 2}4 3 3 K 

Shipping Weight Lbs 1,065 1,125 1,326 1,558 1,910 

Hot water coil for domestic purposes may be had in all sizes. 
See Price List for prices. 



Page Tiicnty-cight 




fHE PENINSULA 



R STOVE COMPANY. DETROIT-CHICAGO 



New Peninsular Warm Air Circulator 

Series 18B - 20B - 22B - 24B 

Especially adapted to burn Soft Coal tmi tvill burn any kind of fuel 

Construction Features 




Extra Large Ash Pit 



ONE PIECE 

HEAVY CAST 

IRON BASE 




One-Piece Base 

With the one-piece base and the deep cup joints that are filled 
with cement, when set makes as tight a joint as if welded, there 
is no possibility of gas escaping into the warm air chamber and 
thence up into the house. The ash pit is exceptionally deep and 
roomy, which allows free circulation of air. 




Page Twe n ty -nine 



■^ "^ ^ PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY. DETROIT-CHICAGO 



Triangular Bar Grate 

The Triangular Bar Grate used in this series positively eliminates 
waste of coal— sifting is unnecessary. It prevents the formation 
of clinkers and causes no dust. This grate is composed of 
triangular bars with teeth 
close together to allow 
burning of small coal, but 
yet not too close to retard 
the draft. Their triangular 
form gives them two cooling 
surfaces in the ash pit and 
in their revolution three 
different surfaces in alter- 
nation are exposed to the 
fire, preventing the bars from warping. Always have the flat 
end of shaker bar up when running fire as this keeps the grates 
right. To remove grate, one bar at a time if desired, a cotter 
pin is all that has to be removed. 




Duplex Grate 



1 



n 



riuiii:-, 






The duplex grate may 
also be furnished with this 
series. It simply slides in 
the ash pit on the tracks 
on either side of the ash 
pit. 



Two-Piece Fire Pot 




Peninsular fire pots are made in two sections so as to take 
care of the expansion and contraction that is necessarily the 
greatest at this point as this is where the greatest heat is. 



Page Thirty 




E PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY. DETROIT-CHICAGO 




Peninsular Feed Section 

Is a heavy, dome-shaped casting of uniform thickness, ribbed 
to add strength and to increase the heat-radiating surface. 

Note the large opening at top of feed section. The ribs on 
this feed section are not mere corrugations, like on most circu- 
lators, but are one inch thick at the top where the point of great- 
est heat is, insuring double strength. 



SMOKE 
FLUE 




All-Cast Radiator 

This large Peninsular Radiator is of the circulating type with 
an extra long fire travel, the purpose of which is to extract more 
heat from the hot gases before they are drawn up the chimney. 
The hot gases enter the wide dome and are divided into two bodies 
that pass to each side of the radiator. For cleaning, you merely 
open the door. 

By making the Peninsular Radiator in two pieces it is possible 
to turn out an even thickness casting that will last longer, as well 
as one that is smooth on the inside. This can not be done with 
a one-piece radiator. 

Soot and ashes will not insulate a smooth casting so readily as 
one that is rough on the inside. You will appreciate more what 
this means when you realize that one-sixteenth inch of soot 
coating reduces the heating efficiency of a casting 10%. 




Page Thirty-one 



THE PENINSULAR STOVE C 



OMPANY, DETROIT-CHICAGO 



III 




Peninsular All-Cast Iron Warm Air Circulator 

Series 18B - 20B - 22B - 24B 

Made in Four Sizes and Cast Radiator Only 

''^^ ^ 18B 2 0B 22B ail 

Inside Diameter of Fire Pot at Top . . 18 ' 2(1 " 99 » n /» ~ 

Depth of Fire Pot ^ {J^ * jjs/. 22 24 

Inside Diameter of Fire Pot at Grate . . . , uQ " 17 ^^ i o^ on ^' 

Diameter of Radiator 99^ ^2' il" io" 

Height of Radiator. ■■ to" lOU ' ?f 1/ - i?* 

Height of Circulator isM" 49^" 5}^ It 

Diameter of Casing 35K^ tV' ^^ 1%. 

Height of Casmg 58 * rq » ^", *7 ^ 

Diameter of Smoke Collar ^ 1* ^L ^4 

Heating Capacity, Cubic Feet 11,000 15,000 20 000 26 000 

HeatingXapacity, Sq. Inches Pipe Area 280 360 430 550 

(irate Area, Square Feet lU t 3^ Ziy ^^ o-tx 

Shipping Weight : ,sV' 9lJ^ 1,050^ 1,2^^ 

Hot water coil for domestic purposes may be famished 
See Price List for prices 



Page Thirty-t7i<o 




THE PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY, DETROIT-CHICAGO 

How a Peninsular Warm Air Circulator Looks 
with the Galvanized Casing On 




Note the cone-shaped hood which acts as a "robber" for every 
pipe. There is no dead air space in the Peninsular Hood. 

Ail Galvanized Casings on Peninsular Warm Air Circulators 
are made of 26 gauge iron and lined with asbestos and corrugated 
iron. 




Page Thirty-three 



THE PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY. DETROIT-CHICAGO 



Peninsular Warm Air Circulator 

Series 6136, 6140, 6144, 6148, 6154, 6160 have Cast Radiator 
Series 636, 640, 644, 648, 654, 660 have Steel Radiator 

A Low Priced Furnace, but Peninsular in Every Respect 



Construction Features 

Heavy cast iron base cast in one piece. Extra large ash pit. 




Fire Pots 

Are made in two 
sections. Walls are 
very straight, and 
pots themselves very 
deep. These sections 
are joined by means 
of deep, wide cup 
joints, which amply 
allow for expansion 
and contraction and 
offer a perfect bed for 
the asbestos cement. 



, Steel Radiator on 636 Series 

Has no cold or in- 
active radiating sur- 
faces. All the heat 
units are brought in 
contact with an out- 
side surface. Its con- 
struction is such that 
it permits a continu- 
ous flow of air in large 
volumes to come in 
contact with the 
heated radiating sur- 
faces. The products 
of combustion enter 
the radiator from the 
front of the furnace 

from either side, and must pass around the entire radiator 
before passing into the chimney flue. 




Page Thirty-four 




THE PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY. DETROIT-CHICAGO 




Peninsular All Cast Warm Air Circulator 

Series 6136 - 6140 - 6144 - 6148 - 6154 - 6160 

Built especially for Soft Coal. Will burn Hard Coal, Coke, 
Wood or Natural Gas with equal success 

This Circulator is furnished with the Anti-Clinker Bar Grate only 

ITEM 6136 6140 6144 6148 6154 6160 

Inside Diamete' Fire Pot 

at Top 16" 18" 20' 22" 24" 27" 

Depth Fire Pot 10" 10}^" 111^' 12^' 13^" 13^" 

Inside Diameter Fire Pot ^ ^^^ ^^^ 

at Grate 13" 14^' 17' 19' 20" 23" 

Diameter Radiator 25" 29" 32" 34" 38;; 40" 

Height Radiator 9" 10" lOM' HH" 13^ 15^ 

Height of Circulator 43" 48 H" 49 34" 51" 52" 54" 

Diameter of Casing .... 32" 35 J^" 37" 40" 44^ 47 ^ 

Height of Casing 56" 58" 59" 62" 64^ 67 

Diameter Smoke Collar... 7" 8" 8" 9" 9" 9" 
Heating Capacity, Square 

Inches Pipe Area 132 280 360 430 550 625 

Heating Capacity, Cu. Ft. 7,000 11.000 15,000 20,000 26.000 33,000 

Size Feed Door 8xlOH 8>^xllH 83^x11^ 8^x12 93^x13 9^x13 

Grate Area, Square Feet . . I'A 1 H 15-4 „ 2 3^ , , ,? ^ , « J 

Shipping Weight 635 720 775 900 1118 1,300 

Hot water coil for domestic purposes may be furnished 
See Price List for prices 




Page Thirty-five 



THE PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY, DETROIT-CHICAG 




Peninsular Warm Air Circulator 

Series 6;i6 - 640 - 64 1 - 648 - 654 - 660 

Buill especially for Hard Coal Coke, Wood or Natural Cas 
This Circulator is furnished with the Anti-Clinker Bar Grate only 

ITEM 636 640 644^^ 648 654 660 

Inside Diameter Fire Pot 

^ at Top 16" 18' 20" 22' 24" 27" 

Depth Fire Pot 10 " 10^" H U " 12 ' i " Li i i " 131," 

Inside Diameter Fire Pot * ^ ^"^^ 

at Grate 13 " 14^4 " 17 *' 1 1> '' ■->() " 03 " 

Diameter Radiator 25 " 29 " 32 " 31 " 'i}{ " ^0 " 

Height Radiator 9" 10 " 1 1 .^ " 1 1 1 ., " 13" k> " 

Height Circulator 44 "^ 48 V 2 " 4'> ' ■" " 5 [ '' ' 5'"> " fj 1. " 

Diameter Casing . 32 " .'15 ' ■> " 37 '' " :\9 ' ., " 44 " 47 " 

Height Casing 56 " 58 " 59 " 62 " " 64 " 67 " 

Diameter Smoke Collar ... 7 " 8 " 8 " 9 " 9 " q " 

Heating Capacity, Cu. Ft. 7,000 11,000 15,000 20,000 26,000 ."i.T 000 
Heating Capacity, Square 

Inches Pipe Area 132 280 1160 430 550 6''>3 

Size Feed Door 8xl0>2 8HxllK 8)^x11^4 8}2xl2 9j2xi;J 9i^xl3 

Grate Area, Square Feet. . 1 1 >2 IH 2H '>H ' " *J 

Shipping Weight 635 720 775 900 1,11*8 1,300 

Hot water coil for domestic purposes way be furnished 
See Price List for prices 

Page Thirty-six 




p 



FHE PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY, DETROIT-CHICAGO 

The Peninsular System 

of 

Sanitary Room Heating and Ventilation 

For Schools, Churches and Halls 
No Basement Needed 




I'fVSTOVESXt; 




The Peninsular System of Heating and 
Ventilation of School Rooms 

First — Supplies to each child an abundance of pure, fresh air. 

Seco/irf^Removes from the room all the foul and cold ah. 

Third — Saves the doctor's bills, as it does away with poisonous 
air and cold drafts, which cause headaches, colds and coughs. 

Fourth— Adds fully twenty-five per cent to the efficiency of 
the school, as teacher and pupils can do more and better work 
under Sanitary Ventilation. 

Fifth — Saves fuel. 

Sixih — Does away with cold floors — allows seating of children 
right next to heater. 

Seventh— la an investment that pays large annual dividends to 
the taxpayers of the district in 

Better Health of the Children; /" 

A More Efficient School; 

Greater Economy in Running Expenses. 




Page Thirty -seven 



THE PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY. DETROIT-CHICAGO 




The Peninsular System of School Room 
Heating and Ventilating 

The above illustration shows the method of installing the 
Peninsular Room Heater where a double flue is provided, one 
for the smoke and one for foul air, having a register at the floor 
line. 

The Arrows show how the cold air passes through the casing 
about the furnace, mingling with the incoming fresh air, how 
this warm, pure air passes out at the top of the heater and flows 
into every part of the room, how the foul air is extracted through 
the Vent Register up the chimney vent flue. 

The circulation is constant, rapid and complete; it floods the 
room in every corner with pure outdoor air, rich in oxygen and 
warmed to the right temperature. This is the only system that 
is now permissible to use in most states. 

See Price List for price. 



Page Thirty eight 







THE PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY. DETROIT -CHICAGO 




The Peninsular Room Heater 

Series 6136 - 6140 - 6141 - 6148 - 6154 - 6160 
The 18B Series May Also Be Used for Heating Large Halls, 
Churches, Schools and Stores When a Ventilating 
System Is Not Desired 

All Slyles and Sizes of Peninsular Warm Air Circulators are made 

in Room Heaters as Illustrated, The Prices of Jackets 

are the same as the Regular Casing 

ITEM 6136 6140 6144 6148 6154 6160 

Inside Diameter Fire Pot at Top 16^ 18' 20' 22' ^ 24' ^ 27' 

Depth of Fire Pot 10 lOH ^ ]m ]fA l^M l^A 

Inside Diameter Fire Pot at Grate 13' 14^^ 1^ „ 19 20 ^A 

Diameter of Casing 32' 35^2 ' 3? 39^2 44 47^ 

Kf FLd'Cr'"' 8xloH 8HXUK. ^^1% 8^x12 9^x13 9^x13 

liStS':^:^^^^^^^ "'^^5 'fZ « IS 

Heating Capacity, Square Inches 

H^t^'"^!'.^^"^'''*."'.^"''™ no 350 450 540 670 780 

If wanted with Foul Air Remover add {see price list) 
See Price List for prices. 




Page Thirty-nine 



^ ^ E PENINSULAR STOVE COMP 



ANY. DETROIT-CH 



I C A G O 




View showing installation of the Improved Peninsular Pipeh 
Furnace System 



ess 



The Peninsular Pipeless Furnace System 
of Home Warming and Ventilating 

Burns any kind <f fuel-Soft Coal, Hard Coal, Wood 
Coke or Nalural Gas 

and produces a big volume of warm air ' ^ " "'' """'>'• 
Sserve":"' ' '^^"'"^"'^'- ^'^^'^^ System ale w3ellTn 

which construction insures a much longer lived heatFng system 

(5) keeps entire houLTaT^tlZralu^^^^^^^ '''' 




Page Forty 



E PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY. DETROIT-CHICAGO 

In the Peninsular Pipeless Furnace we have to uiFer you one 
of those rare articles that have met with the popular approval ot 
the buying puWic— one which carries with it a proht only tound 
with real specialties. 

How It Heats 

The Peninsular Pipeless heating system is based on two prin- 
ciples of the law of gravity. First, that warm air rises, becond. 
that cold air falls. 

The question may come to your mind as to how this furnace 
can heat any part of the house besides the room that contains 
the register. This is easily understood when you take into con- 
sideration the average size of warm air pipes (10 mches) used on 
a pipe furnace. 

The area of a 10-inch pipe is approximately one-half of one 
square fool. One of these pipes leads to each room to be heated. 
Thus, all the heat that is conveyed into each room must come 
through one of these small pipes. 

But. with the Peninsular Pipeless system of heating all of the 
heat is passed through one large pipe and emptied into a room 
centrally located. From this room the heated air finds its level, 
iust as water does, and flows from the room in which the register 
is located through large door openings having an area ot 17 sq. 
ft. or 35 times as large as the 10-inch pipe opening. 

The Peninsular Pipeless system of heating and ventilating is 
easy to operate-nothing to get out of order. It ^^y be easily 
and conveniently installed in old houses in Lt.hb ItlAiN 
EIGHT HOURS. - 

Demand 

Pipeless furnaces have now been successfully used for 10 years 
by people in every walk of life and in all states of the union 
As a result, the demand by the people for the winter comfort 
which they are entitled to and can surely get with a Peninsular 
Pipeless Furnace, the dealers' sales have been increasing year by 
year. 

Don't hire any extra help to handle this business. Use your 
present force. • 

Sell Them Like Stoves 
The exclmive Peninsular Agency is worth money to you 

Hundreds of furnace dealers, men who have learned from 
their years of practical experience to recognize at a glance^ the 
qualitV in furnace construction that guarantees satisfaction have 
quickly attached their names to the rapidly growing list ot 
exclusive Peninsular agents. 

Get lined up now on this proposition. Write us for our com- 
plete selling plans, which include our service and co-operation 
policy. 




Page Forty-one 



I C A G C 




One of Several Rons of //o«s,..s ,„ Smth Ben,i 



' >^>ih niB Pipelpss Furnaces 




Mattoon, 111., Oct. 29, 1920 
Peninsular Stove Co., 

Gentlemen :--Last fall The Mattoon 
^uggy & Implement Co. installed in 
our home a Peninsular Pipeless Fur- 
nace We are healing every room in 
the house to our entire satisfaction, 
in tact, we are more than pleased with 
It, and we would not be without it for 
any price. Before we had a Pipeless 
t urnace we used a stove with which we 
could not heat the entire house although 
we used as much fuel as we now use to 
heat the entire house. Yours truly, 
G. V. Troxel, 
2512 Pine Ave., Mattoon, 111. 



Kansas City, Kan., Nov. 20, 1920 
t.S. GoebelF. &C. Co., 
. Gentlemen:— We have had our Pen- 
insular Pipeless Furnace two winters 
and we cannot say too much for it as 
It Heats our house comfortably all 
nf f^T iv^"" a surprisingly small amount 
of lue . My daughter next door had you 
install one m her house and she feels 
the same as we do. Would not take 
ten times its cost and be without it. 

Wishing the best of success with the 
Penmsular Pipeless Furnace, We remain 
Mrs. Quilty, 2409 Orville 





House in Royal Oak, Mich., Heated with 9B Pipeless 



Friendship, N. Y,, Feb. 22 19n 
Peninsular Stove Co., 

na?^T„ Us%7us/a„ji*t*^,' fhrfcr"' "Tl' ''"^ ""/-"^ yourlPipele^s Fur- 
to build one or two bungalows thU?.™ ^^ ^t^"""' "' '" t"""- ^ «"> going 
and can handle some KurfurnacSTfhP n '"" " '^"^Pl"'*"' «"^ P'"'n»>«r 
agency in this town if you wan" me ^ ut^ f* T "«''*• W'" take the 
spring. There are a numberTpr^sne^^ hlH'^^%,^^^^ ^ P"*'" •"«"> th's 
that can be had on your furnaces '^ here now Please send the lowest price 

lours, U. R. Stillman. 




Page Forty-two 



PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY. D E T R O 1 T - C H 1 C A G O 



^^ 



Kansas City, Kansas, 
November 16, 1920. 
Globe Furniture Company, 
Kansas City, Kansas. 
Gentlemen:— This is the second 
winter for our pipeless furnace and it 
has been giving such good results that 
we are very much pleased with it. 

We had contemplated for a number 
of years having a furnace put m our 
home, but the house was of the old 
style architecture built some years ago, 
with walls of solid brick. When we 
took up the question of havmg a 
furnace installed, we learned it would 
be practically impossible to mstall an 
ordinary pipe furnace because of these 
solid walls. This same condition 
proved true with the steam and hot 
water furnaces, in which case the pipes 
would have been placed in conspicuous 
places throughout the house. 

The pipeless furnace seemed to be 
the only solution for our problem, and 
it has proven to be a very good one. 
Very truly yours, 
(Signed) Mrs. Fred Sortor. 
(No. 12B pipeless furnace in this 
house) . 



Kansas City, Kansas, 
December 12, 1920. 

F. S. GOEBEL FURN. Co., 

Kansas City, Kansas. 
Gentlemen:— When you installed a 
Peninsular Pipeless Furnace in our 
store we were in doubt as to results. 
But after trying same out during the 
very coldest weather we find that this 
furnace heats our two salesrooms very 
evenly and we can keep any degree of 
temperature desired in both rooms. 
We find the fuel consumption much 
less than when we were using stoves. 
And, of course, we have a very much 
better heated store, the heat being 
evenly distributed to all parts. 

F. A. Crowley. 





The Peninsular Stove Co., 
Detroit, Mich. 

Gentlemen:— We are pleased to 
recommend the Peninsular Pipeless 
Furnace which you installed in our 
home last year. Our home has ten 
large rooms, two bathrooms and two 
large halls. We have good comfort- 
able heat in all the rooms during the 
very coldest weather. 

The one room that we were in doubt 
about was the sleeping porch on the 
extreme back of the house on the 
second floor. This was heated very 
nicely, in fact, I used it as a sewmg 
room during the cold weather. 

We used less coal by far last year 
than we did the year before when we 
tried to heat the house with a pipe 
furnace. Yours truly, 

Mrs. C. J. Jasper. 




Page Forty-three 



"^ HE PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY. DETROIT^ 



CHICAGO 



Gentlemen:— You ask us how we 
liked our Peninsular Pipeless F\irnacc, 
and we cannot say too much for it as 
we heat our home on the same amount 
of coal that we formerly used in a 
No. 18 hot blast and a kitchen raufje, 
and our home is heated comfortably 
all over which contains nine rooms. 

We have used our furnace two 
winters and we recommend it to all 
friends, as you know by the many 
prospects we have sent you. 

Hoping you the best of success as 
you certainly have a good furnace, 
We remain, 

Mr. S. a. Jackson. 





Mattoon, 111., 
October 29, 1920. 
The Pkninsiji.au Stove Co., 

Gentlemen:— in 1918 The' Mattoon 
Implement ^ Buggy Co. inslallefi in 
our 9-room house a Peninsular Pipe- 
less Furnace. We had previously used 
hot water heat which cost us to heat 
our home $150.00 per year. In 1918, 
which was a mihi winter, we used 7 
ton of soft coal which cost |:i8.50. In 
1919, which was a long, cold winter, 
we used 9 ton of soft coal which cost 
$54.00. 

We are heating our home better tliaii 
we ever heated it before. Every room 
IS warm and we are very well pleased 
with It, 

Yours rt^spec^tfully, 
Mrs. John Trott, 
2717 Western Ave., 

.,. r. Mattoon, 111. 

(Mr. Trott is Illinois Central Pas. 
Conductor; has been in service 35 
years.) 



Brownstown, Illinois, 
January 31, 1920. 
Pbninsular Stove Co., 
Chicago, 111. 
Gentlemen:— I have in my home (a7- 
room house, five downstairs, and two 
upstairs), one of your Peninsular lOB 
Pipeless Furnaces and am exceptionally 
well pleased with it and have had no 
trouble with it in any way. It is verv 
economical in consumption of fuel anrl 
heats the house at an even temperature 
no matter how cold it is out. 

I would reconnnend it as good a 
furnace as money could buy. 
Yours truly, 
Charles E. Reeter 




Page Forty -four 




THE PENINSULAR STOVE COMPA 



NY. DETROIT-CHICAGO 



A Miracle Worker— The New and Improved 
Peninsular Pipeless Furnace 

Series 9B - lOB - IIB - 12B 

Heats the entire house through one Register and keeps the 
basement cool. Burns any kind (»f fuel, soft coal, hard coal, 
wood, coke or natural gas. 

Construction Features 



ONE PIECE 
HEAVY CAST 
RON BASE 




One Piece, Heavy Cast Iron Base Used in Peninsular 
Warm Air Circulators 

Note the Very Deep Cup Joints 




Extra Large Ash Pit 

The Peninsular Ash Pit and Grates 

An important feature of this series is the ash pit; its extra size 
insures a good hot fire. If your ash pit is small and cramped 
you can not get the proper supply of air so necessary for a good 
fire. 




Page Forty-fi^'e 



THE PENINSU 



LAR STOVE 



^ O M P ANY. DETROIT-C^T 



C A G C 




Two-Piece Fire Pot 



cracking. The hottest nart nf f 1.1 fi ^ two sections to prevent 
At this point the^gSeText^^^^^^^ 

takes place. The special PeSs , W . ^^'° °°.'^*' ^^^^^'^gs 
all Peninsular furnarsTnl^rLtH»^rfV„ri ""' "° 




Feed Section 

buSion'^'^VJ oSinf a^tl^^^^^^^^ 7^'f 7"^? P-^-* -™- 
that it does notTetaM the draft A I'Jr""^ 'T'^'T ''■ ^° '^^^'^ 
the feed door neck which So^ot tt.:T.ytoZtTsrjTtt 



Page Forty -sir 




E PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY, DETROIT-CHICAG O 



SMOKE 

FLUE 




JOINTS 



Peninsular All-Cast Radiator 

This large Peninsular Radiator is of the circulating type with an 
extra long fire travel, the purpose of which is to extract more heat 
from the hot gases before they are drawn up the chimney. Ihe 
hot gases enter the wide dome and are divided mto two bodies 
that pass to each side of the radiator. For cleaning, you merely 
open the door. 

By making the Peninsular Radiator in two pieces it is possible 
to turn out an even thickness casting that will last longer, as well 
as one that is smooth on the inside. This can not be done with a 
one-piece Radiator. 

Soot and ashes will not insulate a smooth casting so readily as 
one that is rough on the inside. You will appreciate more what 
this means when you realize that one-sixteenth inch of soot coat- 
ing reduces the heating efficiency of a casting 10%. 

Large double feed door measures 12^ x 14, which enables the 
user to throw in extra large knots of wood and chunks ot coal. 




Duplex Grate 

This series of circulators may also be furnished with a duplex 
grate; the shaking from side to side of the Annular Ring cleans 
out the ashes around the outer edge and the dump in the center 
is easily opened up and all clinkers fall through. 




Page Forty-seven 



THE PEN.MSU.AP STOVH C OMPANV, O . T P O I T ■ C H I C . C 



r.:.!/ f ""^ 'P'^"^ ^''"'^ '" P""'"S ™ balky casing rings on 
p.peless furnaces-nngs made in one piece-y^hln the k,b shouM 
only have taken a few minutes, you will apprec ate he .reat 
value of Peninsular special adjustable casing °ings ^ 

sive^^nin'IXrrt;.'^'^^'^^^^ ^"™^^ ^'^"'PP-' ^^^ the exclu- 



I 




Adjustable in a minutes time—makes 
casings stay together and air-tight 

_ The ring is put on the casing loose and after all adinstpH 
tightened up and as a further guard against eUher ?he inne or 
outer hood slipping off of the ring there are six bolts and It 

mav hTh U ^.'^ It '""^'' ^"'l ""^«'- ^^"ter casing H^g so 
may be bolted to the lop and casing, so with the adiustable 

STt^'st'ay"' ''' "*^ °' '"'^■^ ^^^"' '^^ f™ is sorted it 



The Peninsular Water Coil 








/^aS'f' Forty-eight 



HE PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY. DETROIT-CHICAGO 

Duplex Floor Register 

Furnished with all Penin- 
sular Pipeless Furnaces is a 
combination return air intake 
and warm air outlet. The 
warm air rises through the 
circular inside portion direct 
from the furnace. The other 
section admits the return air 
to the insulated outer casing, 

where it is drawn to the bottom of the heater. There it comes in 
direct contact with hot radiating surfaces, is heated and rises 
through the center of the register to recirculate through the 
building. 

Peninsular Pipeless registers are one size larger than are ordi- 
narily used, so as to admit a large volume of warm air through 
the register at a slow speed. When small registers are used the 
heated air rises so rapidly that it causes a draft on the floor by the 
cold air returning to the register. With the Peninsular large 
register this is impossible. 





Adjustable Ceiling Ventilators may be used to allow heat to 
go into second floor rooms when the doors are closed. Illustra- 
tion shows method of installation. These ventilators do not come 
as regular equipment; if desired, should be ordered special. 

All Peninsulars are shipped with adjustable collars between cas- 
ing and register, so that they can be installed in any basement 
from 6 to 8 feet. For greater height extra size casings can be 
furnished. 




Page Forty-nine 



THE PENINSULAR S 



TOVE COMPANY 



DETROIT-CHICAGO 

Sectional Cut Showing the Wonderful Points 
of the New Peninsular Pipeless Furnace ^ 



SLACK JAPAN 

REGISTER 



COLD AIR INTAKE 



\ 

FINISH \ ^ ' ' 1 4 ' t f /^ 

I \ \>HOT, AIR foilJTLET / 



INNER CASING 

SLEEVE 

ADJUSTS FROM 

6 TO 8 FEET 



CONE SHAPED 

HOOD 

ALLOWS PASSAGE 

OF LARGE 

AMOUNT OF 

COLD AIR 



PATENT EXPANDING 
CASING RING 



INNER CASING 

MADE OF GALVANIZED 

IRON AND LINED ALL 

THE WAY UP WITH 

ASBESTOS AND 
CORRUGATED IRON 



LARGE COLD AIR 
CAPACITY 




COLD AIR INTAKE 



SLIP JOINT OUTER 

CASING SLEEVE 

ADJUSTING HEIGHT 

OF HEATER FROM 

6 TO 8 FEET 



CASING CLEAN OUT 
DOOR 

ITEM QH^- j^g— 

Inside Diameter of Fire Pot at Top. T^ ia^ :^~ 

Depth of Fire Pot ^ {ni/ . ??„/ 

Inside Diameter of Fire Pot at Grate ' 140 " \\i^ 

Diameter of Radiator on^^ io * 

Height of Radiator ff.. ?2 

Diameter of Inside Casing -ii" ^"<^ 

Diameter of Outside Casing . . 71" Ji. 

Diameter of Smoke Collar . J * *S ' 

Size of Feed Door nu^iii/^ i«>r/iii/« 

Size of Register 28 xU^ J?^^U^ 

Size of Warm Air Pipe... : ^** HI. ^7 xi5 

Height of Casing ..... 6 Mn R ' ^ / ♦ L 

Square Feet Grate Surface. MX fay 

Heating Capacity, Cubic Feet ,.:::::::: 13,500 18 000 

Heating Capacity, Sq. Inches Pipe Area . . 'sso 45? 

Shipping Weight 980 ^ j^O 

Hot water cod for domestic purposes may 
See Price List for prices. 



IIB 



22' 
12 1^" 
19" 
34* 

ny2 

40' 

48' 

9" 

123^x14' 
35 x35 ' 
26' 
6 ' to 8 ' 
2H 
25,000 
540 
1,325 



BEVELED CAST IRON 
' EXTENSION FRAME 



LARGE DOUBLE 
FEED DOOR 
'. X 14 INCHES 



EXTRA LARGE 

HUMIDIFIER 

KEEPS AIR IN 

DWELLING MOIST 



LARGE ASH PIT 

GRATES EASILY 

REMOVED 



12B 



be furnished. 



24' 

20' 
38' 

44' 

52' 

9" 

12^x14' 

40 x40 " 

30" 

6'to 8' 

3 

32,000 

670 

1,600 



Page Fifty 




PHE PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY, DETROIT-CHICAGO 

The Peninsular One Pipe Heater 

May be used with any Peninsular Heater 




Showing Heater Installed in Basement 



A regular furnace and casing is used and connected up to this 
register. With this system it is very easy to run a pipe to a bath 
room or room a long distance from the furnace. The registers 
come in Oak and Mahogany finish, and in 15", 18", 20", 24" 



sizes. 



See Price List for Price of Register and Boot 



The curved diffuser in the warm air compartment throws the 
heat out into the room evenly. The cold air is returned to the 
furnace through the compartment at each end of the register. 
It is usually located against an inside wall but it can be placed 
on an outside wall under a window and operate very successfully, 
built into a colonade or partition or serve as a base for a book case. 




Page Fifty -one 



THE PENINSULAR ST 



OVE COMPANY 



DETROIT-CHICA- 



Measurements of Galvanized Iron Casings for 
Peninsular Warm Air Circulators 



Tiiese sizes of casings are the correct mea-I Lower 

surements of circumferences, not allowing nalvani^Arl 
for laps or edges, for riveting and grooving' ^'•J^^^pized 

8840 Peninsular 

Iron recommended .... 

Height 

Circumference, less lap . 



8844 Peninsular 

Iron recommended 

Height 

Circumference, less lap . . 

8848 Peninsular 

Iron recommended . . 

Height 

Circumference, less lap . . . 

8854 Peninsular 

Iron recommended .... 

Height 

Circumference, less lap . . . 

9940 Peninsular 

Iron recommended 

Height 

Circumference, less lap . . 

9944 Peninsular 

Iron recommended . . 

Height 

Circumference, less lap . . 

9948 Peninsular 

Iron recommended 

Height . , 

Circumference, less lap . , 

9954 Peninsular 

Iron recommended. 

Height 

Circumference, less lap . . 

9960 Peninsular 

Iron recommended . . 

Height 

Circumference, less lap . . . 



26 gauge 

20K" 
9' 934" 



Center 

Galvanized 

Casing 



26 gauge 
26" 

10' 7%" 



26 gauge 
193^" 



9' 9M 



26 gauge 

19H" 
10' 5K" 

26 gauge 

203^" 
11' 115^" 

26 gauge 

203^" 

9' 914" 

26 gauge 

19^" 
9' 9}4" 

26 gauge 

193^" I 

10' 53^" 

26 gauge 

203^" 

11' ny^' 

24 gauge 

27" 
13' 83^" 



26 


gauge 
30" 


11 


' IH" 


26 


gauge 
30" 


ir 


IIJ^" 



26 gauge 
30" 

13' 4J4" 

26 gauge 
28" 

10' 7M^' 

26 gauge 
30" 

11' IH" 

26 gauge 

30" 
11 '11^" 

26 gauge 

30" 
13' 4%" 



24 gauge 
28" 



Upper 

Galvanized 

Casing 



26 gauge 
12" 

10' 7%" 

26 gauge 

]2" 
ll'l^i'' 

26 gauge 

12" 
11' 113^" 



26 gauge 
12" 

13' iJ4" 

26 gauge 
12" 

10' 7M" 

26 gauge 

12" 
11'1%" 

26 gauge 
12'' 

w'wy/ 

26 gauge 
14" 

13' 4>^" 

24 gauge 
14' 



15' 53^" 15' 53^^' 



Page Fifty-iWo 




THE PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY. DETROIT-CHICAGO 

Measurements of Galvanized Iron Casings for 
Peninsular Warm Air Circulators 



Thesn sizes of casinps are the correct mea- 
siircmenls of circumferences, not allowing 
for laps or edges, for riveting and grooving 



Lower 

Galvanized 

Casing 



Center 

Galvanized 

Casing 



636 and 6136 Peninsular 

Iron recommended i 26 gauge 

Height 20'' ^^ 

Circumference, less lap . . . 1 'H I 

640 and 6140 Peninsular 

Iron recommended. ...... 26 gauge 

Height ^24" ^^ 

Circumference, h^ss lap ... 7 ' 11 

614 and 6144 Peninsular 

Iron recommended 26 gauge 

Height ^24" 

Circumference, less lap . . . 8 ' 2%" 

648 and 6148 Peninsular 

Iron recommended 26 gauge 

Height 253^''^^ 

Circumference, less lap . . . 8 ' 8^" 

654 and 6154 Peninsular 

Iron recommended 26 gauge 

Height 24" ^^ 

Circumference, less lap ... 9 ' 8" 

660 and 6160 Peninsular 

Iron recommended 26 gauge 

Height 24" 

Circumference, less lap. . . 10 ' l%" 

18B Peninsular 

Iron recommended 26 gauge 

Height 24"^^ 

Circumference, less lap ... 7 ' 11'' 

20B Peninsular 

Iron recommended 26 gauge 

Height 24" ^^ 

Circumference, less lap . . . 8 ' 2%" 

22B Peninsular 

Iron recommended 26 gauge 

Height 253^"^^ 

Circumference, less lap . . . 8 ' 8H" 

24B Peninsular i 

Iron recommended 26 gauge 

Height 24" ^^ 

Circumference, less lap . . . 9 ' 8 " 



Upper 

Galvanized 

Casing 



I 



26 gauge 

21 H" 

7'^" 

26 gauge 

21" 
7' 11" 

26 gauge 

22" 
8' 2%" 

26 gauge 

22" 
8' 8M" 

26 gauge 

26" 

9' 8" 

26 gauge 

26" 
10' IH" 

26 gauge 
21" 

7' 11" 

26 gauge 

22" 
8' 2%" 

26 gauge 

22" 

8' m" 

26 gauge 

26" 

9' 8" 



26 gauge 
12" 

8' iVs" 

26 gauge 

12" 
9' 4" 

26 gauge 

12" 
9' 9^" 

26 gauge 
12" 

10' ^Vs" 

26 gauge 

14" 
11' 6H" 

26 gauge 
14" 

12' 3^" 

26 gauge 
12" 

9' 4" 

26 gauge 
12" 

9' 9^" 

26 gauge 
12" 

10' 5ys" 

26 gauge 

14" 
11' 6H" 




Page Fifty-three 



THE PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY. DETROIT-CHICAGO 



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Page Fifty-five 



THE PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY, DETROIT-CHICAGO 



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Pagfe Fifty-sis 




THE PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY. DETROIT-CHICAGO 

The following parts are listed starting from 
the furnace with the casing collar. Go through 
each page and note the parts needed and your 
pipe order will be complete. 




(basing Collar 

Size of I'ipo 9-iiicji 

Sizeof IMpe !!!i"*t 

Size of I»ii>e. 12 -inch 

Size of Pipe 14-inca 

See Price Ltsl 




No Rivet Galvanized Iron Dampers 

Size of Damper 9-inch 

Size of Damper. 10-inch 

Size of Damper 12-inch 

Size of DamiMjr 14-iuch 

See Price List 




Galvanized Cold Air Elbows 

911° Elbow 14" 16" 18" 20" 22" 

6)0 Klbow 14" 16" 18" 20" 22" 

45° Elbow 14" 16" 18" 20" 22" 

See List Price 




Galvanized Iron Smoke Pipe 
Elbows 

90 decree 4 piece 60 dej?ree 3 piece 
22 >2 to 30 degree 2 piece 

Size of Elbow 8-inch 

Size of Elbow 9-inch 

Size of EUx>w 10-inch 

See Price List 




Tin Hot Air Pipe 

Sizeof IMpe 9-jnch 

Size of iHpe l?"-"'' ' 

Size of Pipe 12-inch 

See Price Lisl 





Tin Hot Air Elbows 

90 degree 4 piece 60 decree 3 i)icce 
22 K to 30 degree 2 piece 

Size of EU»ow - . 9-inch 

Size of Elbow lO-mch 

Size of Elbow 12-iuch 

See Price Lint 



Galvanized Iron Cold Air and 
Smoke Pipe 

9" 10" 14" 16" 18" 20" 22" 24" 

See Price List 




Page Fifty -seven 



THE PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY 



D E T R O 



CHICAGO 




Smoke Tee Connection 

Made of Galvanized Iron 

Size of Smoke Pipe 8-inch 

Size of Smoke Pipe. 9-inch 

Size of Smoke Pix)e 10-inch 

See List Price 

In ordering smoke pipe Tee be sure and ad- 
vise us what number Peninsular furnace it is for. 




Cast Smoke Pipe Damper 

Size of Damper 8-inch 

Size of Damper 9-inch 

Size of Damper 10-inch 

See Price List 




Lower casing collar used where no cold air 
connection shoe is used to join cold air pipe 
into casing. 

12' 14' 16' 
See Price List 



Galvanized Cold Air Connections 




if 

Style ( : 

Size of Collar 14 inches 

Size of Collar 16 inches 

Size of Collar 18 inches 

Size of Collar 20 inches 

Size of Collar 22 inches 

Size of Collar 24 inches 

See Price List 

In ordering above always state size of Penin- 
sular Circulator the cold air connection is to be 
used on. 







Ceiling Collar Fitted in a Piece of 
Galvanized Iron to Go Under- 
neath Cold Air Face Plate 

14" 18x IB 

14'... 18x 34 

16' 20x 34 

18'.... 22 x34 

20' 24x34 

24'.... 28x34 

See Price List 



Style P 

Size of Collar 14 inches 

Size of Collar 16 inches 

Size of Collar 18 inches 

Size of Collar 20 inches 

Size of Collar 22 inches 

Size of Collar 24 inches 

See Price List 




Page Fifty -eight 



THE 



PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY. DETROIT-CHICAG 





Ceiling Iron for Joist Casing for 
Cold Air 

CeiUnglron l?!"^!^® 

Ceiling Iron 34" wide 

See Price List 



Wooden Cold Air Faces 

Stock Sizes Carried 
c;„p 16x30 

llzl::::::::;:::::::.:.:. is. 30 

See Price List 




Cut 11 



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Double Register Box— First Floor 

Size Register, 8x10 Size Collar, 9 * 

Size Register, 9 x 12 Size Collar, 9 

Size Register, 10 x 12 Size CoUar, 10 

Size Register, 12 x 14 Size Collar, 12 

Size Register, 14 x 18 Size Collar, 14 

See Price List 



We carry the following Cast Iron Face Plate 
in slock: 
Size 14x18 

ilze::::::;::::;:: ]6-f. 

Size ]6^l* 

Siyp 10 X a<i 

size:::::::::::::. 20x24 

Siye 20x26 

S^p 22x30 

S^e :: 24x30 

^ze:::::::::::::: 30x30 

See Price List 




Page Fifty -nine 



THE PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY. DETROIT-CHICAGO 



Adjustable Wall 

Ventilator to Go 

in Wall near 

Ceiling 

Sizes 

12x36" 12x32" 

See Price List 



1 






1 



m 

D 



■■■■■■■■■ 








PP 






We carry the following sizes ot flo(»r registers 
and borders in stock: 



mm 



Size. 
Size. 
Size. 
Size. 

Size. 



. 8x 10 Size.. .16x20 

. 9 X 12 Size 16x24 

.10x12 Size... 18x24 

.12x14 Size.... 20x24 

.14x18 Size 20x26 



See Price List 




Adjustable Ceiling Ventilator 



Size. 
Size. 



.10 X 12 
. 12 X 14 



See Price List 



Foot Pieces for First Floor 
Registers 



Base 




Cut 10 

Foot Piece 

For 9 Base Box (9x12) 9 " col. 

For 10 Base Box (10 x 12) 10 "col. 

For 12 Base Box (12 x 14) 12 " col. 

For 18 Base Box (9 x 12) on each side 12' col. 
For 20 Base Box (10 x 12) on each side 12 " col. 




Cut B 

Foot Piece 

111 ordering slate what size round pipe and 
base box you are going to use. 
No. Safety Pii>e. 

No. 9 Base Box 9" Col 

No. 10 Base Box ](>" Col 

No. 12 Base Box 12'' Col 

No. 18 Base Box 12^ Col 

No. 20 Base Box 12" CoL 

See Price Li. si 



Page Sixty 




T H E P E N I N S U L A R STOVE COMPANY. DETROIT-CHICAGO 





First Floor Base Box 

Size Size 

Round Pipe Register 

Size 9 ...... 9" INo. 9 Base Reg. 

Sizeiy 10" No. 10 Base Reg. 

Size 12 12 " No. 12 Base Reg. 

See Price List 



No. a 

Offset 

Size No. 7 Wall Pipe 

Size No. 8 Wall Pipe 

Size No. i:i Wall Pipe 

See Price List 





Half Elbow for First Floor Register 
Box 



No. 



10 12 

See Price List 



18 



20 



8 in. Piece Pipe 

Extension Pipe 

To go on bottom of Base Box so foot piece may 

be connected 

Made in the following lengths: 

Size Base Box. 9 10 12 18 20 

Length Hpe... 2 K" 2^^ 2yf 2M; 2^^ 

4K" 4K'' ^H" ^H" 4^ 

8 " 8 *' 8 " 8 " 8 " 




No. 9 

Two-Piece Offset 

Size No. 7 Wall Pipe 

Size No. 8 Wall Pipe 

Size No. 13 Wall Pipe 

See Price List 




Base Box for Register on Either 
Side 

Size Round Pipe 
With a 9 Rase Reg. (9 x 12) on each side ■ . • 1«'' 
With a 10 Base Reg. (10 x 12) on each side. . 12" 

See Price List 




Page Sixty -one 



THE PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY. D 



ETROIT-CH ICAGO 





Base Box for Base Register 
with Extension Top 

Size Size 
Round Pipe Register 

Size 9 .9" No. 9 Base Reg. 

Size 10 10'' No. 10 Base Reg, 

Size 12 12 * No. 12 Base Reg. 

See Price List 



Foot Pieces for Wall Pipe 



Cut 10 

Foot Piece 

In ordering state what size wall pipe and 
round pipe to use. 

Size No., 7 pipe, 9' 

Size No., 8 Pipe, 9 ' 

Size No., 13 Pipe, 10' 

See Price List 




Cut S 

Foot Piece 

No. Safety Pipe, 7 Size CoUar, 9-in 

No. Safety Pipe, 8 Size Collar, 9-in 

No. Safety Pipe, 13 Size Collar, 10-in 

See Price List 





CutB 
Foot Piece 

In ordering state what size round pipe and 
wall pipe you are going to use. 

No. Safety Pipe, 7 Size Collar 9" 

No. Safety Pipe, 8 Size Collar 9" 

No. Safety Pipe, 13 Size Collar 10* 

See Price List 



Double Wall Pipe 

Size, 7 Outside Measurement, 3^x 9J^ 

Size, 8 Outside Measurement, 3^x12^ 

Size, 13 Outside Measurement, 3^x14^ 

Furnished following lengths: 

2M inches 10% inches 

4% inches ISJ^ inches 

8 inches 26^ inches 

See Price List 



Page Sixty -two 




THE PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY, DETROIT- CHICAGO 




90° Square Elbow 

Size, 7 Outside Measurement, 35^x 9% 

Size, 8 Outside Measurement, 3^x12^ 

Size, 13 Outside Measurement, 3^x14^ 

See Price List 




Cuts 

90^ 2-Piece Elbow 

Size, 7 Outside Measurement, S^^x 9]4 

Size, 8 Outside Measurement, 3^^x125^ 

Size, 13 Outside Measurement, 3^x14^ 

See Price List 




Cut 17 

Tee with Large Riser and Small 
Branches 



Size No. 7. . .Outside Measurement, 3^x 9]4 
Size No. 8. . Outside Measurement, 3^x12^ 
Size No. 13. . .Outside Measurement, 35^x14^ 

See Price List 




Cut 23 

Second Floor Floor Box 

When ordering state what size wall pipe you 
are going to use. 

Size Register, 8x10 Size Wall Pipe, 7 

Size Register, 8x12 Size Wall Pipe, 8 

Size Register, 10x12 Size WaU Pipe, 13 

See Price List 




Cut 19 

Tee with Large Riser and Extension 
and Small Branch 

Size No. 7 . . .Outside Measurement, 35^x 9]4 
Size No. 8. . Outside Measurement, 3^x12^ 
Size No. 13 . . . Outside Measurement, ^^xl4% 

See Price List 




No. 16 

Double Register Box for Floor, 
Without Collar 

For floor register and border give size wall 
pipe it has to fit, and size register desired to use. 

No. Safety Pipej 7 Size Register, 8x10 

No. Safety Pipe, 8 Size Register, 9x12 

No. Safety Pipe, 13 Size Register, 12x15 

See Price List 




Page Sixty -three 



THE PENINSULAR STOVE COMPANY, DETROIT-CHICAGC 





Cutl 
Single Register Box ^^^^ Register 

To go in wall above base board. Ox. Black Nickel 

Size 9 9x12 

Size Wall Pipe, No. 7 Size Register, 8x1 Size! 10,' 10 x 12 

Size Wall Pipe, No. 8. . . . . .Size Regisl«r, 8x12 Size, 12, 12 x 14 '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 

See Price List See Price FasI 




Cut 2 

Register Box for Two 
Registers 




Size Wall Pipe, No. 8 Size of Register on Size, 8x10. 

each side, 8x10 up Size, 8x12. 

See Price List 



Wall Register Across 

Ox. Rlack Nickel 



See Price List 



Page ^ Page Sixty -funr 




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1